Most of those responding to an Argus-Courier online poll said that the city should not consider extending water and sewer services to the Dry Creek Tribe if it would mean they would agree not to build a casino on their parcel south of Petaluma.
About 71 percent thought the city should not extend the services, while almost 24 percent thought the city should. About 5 percent weren’t sure.
Here were some of the comments.
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“Absolutely not. With water and sewer in place, what’s to stop a change of ownership on the property as a loophole to get a casino built there eventually? I do not trust anycasino dealings.”
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“Don’t do it! They’ll agree now but in a few years the idea would come up again and they’ll build a casino anyway.”
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“Build a casino and let it pay for my higher sewage rates.”
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“Depends on cost of services compared to size of casino, etc.”
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“If they want to build a casino, it’s their right. It’s outside of the city limits and will not affect the vast majority of people in Petaluma. How about instead of fighting the tribe, we work with them to meet both parties’ needs and have it be beneficial to everyone?”
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“Petaluma would have no jurisdiction if they change their minds. The only control we have is not extending the lines now.”
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“Sounds like extortion: ‘If you do this for us, we won’t do this to you.’ How about screaming at our governor and legislature and tell them not to go along with this folly?”
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“System is already taxed. How about they invest in some upgrades in order to get connected?”
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“The casino will happen anyway; let them take care of their own sewer and water. It is what it is, get over it.”
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“Pure blackmail. No water, no casino, no reservation shopping.”
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“Build the casino!”

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